Posts

  • EF Core Migrations: Design-time

    In previous posts, I’ve talked the new .NET Core CLI commands and the enhanced NuGet commands in Entity Framework Core. This post dives into some of the changes we’ve made to enhance the design-time experience of Migrations.

  • EF Core Migrations: NuGet Commands

    With Entity Framework Core comes the great opportunity to improve upon EF’s legacy by incorporating all the lessons we’ve learned over the past few years of developing this software. For me, that means a chance to improve on one of the first features I worked on after joining the team over four years ago: Code First Migrations’ NuGet Commands. In this post, I want to talk about some of the improvements to these PowerShell commands.

  • EF Core Migrations: .NET CLI Commands

    One of the new platforms that we’re targeting in Entity Framework Core is ASP.NET Core. With this new platform comes a new set of challenges for how we enable the Entity Framework commands. Ever since Entity Framework 4.3, we’ve provided a set of PowerShell commands that could be run in Visual Studio from NuGet’s Package Manager Console. However, that won’t help you if you’re developing on OSX where neither PowerShell nor Visual Studio are available. This post will show you how to use the new Entity Framework .NET Core CLI Commands.

  • Using WinMerge with TortoiseGit

    I love WinMerge. My favorite features of it are syntax highlighting and moved block detection. I also love TortoiseGit. Let’s look at how to use WinMerge with TortoiseGit.

  • Querying in PowerShell

    Thanks to my work on Entity Framework’s Code First Migrations NuGet PowerShell commands, I’ve gained quite a bit of experience programming in PowerShell. In this post, I want to show you some of PowerShel’s query operators.

  • Command Prompt is Ugly

    As a developer, I spend a fair amount of time in Command Prompt. Let’s face it, it’s ugly.

  • System.Data.SQLite on Entity Framework 6


    This feature has been added.
    Versions 1.0.91.0 and newer of System.Data.SQLite support EF6, this fork is not required.

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